Black and White Photography

October 5, 2009

At a family gathering this weekend I was reminded of the beauty of black and white photography. Instead of the usual family snapshots of people posing , fakey smiles and bright colors, our efforts were rewarded with a set of timeless pictures where we are not distracted by fashion or fads and the true personalities of our subjects can shine. A lot of times we forget how beautiful Black and White can be, choosing instead the “reality” of color. I have to be honest and say that in the past I’ve kept Black and White for Landscapes and Scenery and the odd posed portrait shot. So think about using this mode for an unusual twist on what could otherwise be another set of snapshots.

Black and White mode can be found on most cameras within the scene mode menu. Look for BW icon or a color mode. I feel it works best in situations where you can forgo flash so if your inside, turn off your flash and push up your ISO to 400 or 800.

If you’d prefer you can desaturate the color from your images after they have been taken by using a photo manipulation program such as Adobe Photoshop Elements or Picasa 3. This will certainly give you more control over the black and white effect you apply but can sometimes be quite laborious if you have several shots to work on.

0 Shares
Ingrid

About the Author

Ingrid

Up for a Challenge? Join us in Take 52!

Improve your photography with weekly practice and get feedback on your work in our friendly Facebook Group of likeminded photography enthusiasts!

Leave a Comment:

All fields with “*” are required
katie

I love this Ingrid! And if you don’t mind, I’d love to share my b&w photography with you…
even if I took the photo in color only to crop it, sharpen it, and finally adjust the color to black and white. :)
http://www.flickr.com/photos/kmslat/4014747755/

Ingrid Owens

Great pics Katie! Seems like you’re really getting the hang of that DSLR! It’s actually best to take your pics in color, then change to B&W when editing as you’re doing. It’s best though to leave the sharpening to the very last thing you do and don’t be afraid to really push the contrast! Thanks for stopping by the blog!

Leave a Comment:

All fields with “*” are required